Ousmane Bah, a New York student, sued Apple for $1 billion

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An 18-year-old teenager from New York has filed a $1 billion lawsuit against Apple claiming that the company’s facial recognition software falsely linked him with a series of thefts that took place at various Apple Stores located across the United States last year.

Ousmane Bah, in his lawsuit against the Cupertino, California headquartered company said that he first received a summon to appear in a Boston court back in May last year where he was charged for stealing goods worth $1,200 from a local Apple Store. In his lawsuit, he has claimed that on the night when the robbery took place, he was attending his senior prom night in Manhattan. The teenager had previously lost a learner’s permit, which did not contain a photo, but may have been used as ID by the thief. In turn, the criminal’s face and Bah’s name may have been linked together on Apple’s facial recognition database. An investigator examined surveillance footage obtained by the Manhattan store and concluded that the suspect did not resemble the student at all, the lawsuit says.

All cases against Bah have been dropped except in New Jersey. The lawsuit was filed on Monday. The claim of $1 billion is related to “severe stress and hardship” caused by the alleged false arrest and charges. If it is found that Bah was not complicit in any the thefts — including the outstanding case — he may be due to some form of compensation for the case of mistaken identity. However, $1 billion may be seen as a stretch, considering the student has not been jailed or appears to have suffered hardship beyond the stress of the court summons. An investigator examined surveillance footage obtained by the Manhattan store and concluded that the suspect did not resemble the student at all, the lawsuit says. All cases against Bah have been dropped except in New Jersey. The lawsuit was filed on Monday. The claim of $1 billion is related to “severe stress and hardship” caused by the alleged false arrest and charges. If it is found that Bah was not complicit in any the thefts — including the outstanding case — he may be due to some form of compensation for the case of mistaken identity. However, $1 billion may be seen as a stretch, considering the student has not been jailed or appears to have suffered hardship beyond the stress of the court summons.

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